Grocery Shop | Mehndi Shop | Spice Shop | Beauty Shop | Join | Sign In | Submit Recipe

New & Improved Search Helps You Find Even More Recipes & Videos!


Articles >> Food Fact articles > Lemongrass

Lemongrass

Lemongrass
Learn a little about the art of cooking with lemongrass. Traditionally cultivated in tropical Asia, mostly for its essential oil and edible stem, this herb can be grown anywhere with a temperate climate. Lemongrass has made its way into Western kitchens and can now be found in a range of countries, such as the West Indies and America.
Viewed: 2668
Source:  Wasim Ahmed
1 Ratings
4 out of 5 stars
 Rate It

  • Learn a little about the art of cooking with lemongrass. Traditionally cultivated in tropical Asia, mostly for its essential oil and edible stem, this herb can be grown anywhere with a temperate climate. Lemongrass has made its way into Western kitchens and can now be found in a range of countries, such as the West Indies and America.

  • Lemongrass, also known as Cymbopogon citrates, grows in tall bunches on a 1 m (3ft) perennial greenish plant. It’s a delightful grass-like herb with a refreshing citrus flavor and gingery overtones. Resembling the spring onion in appearance, it’s usually used as seasoning or for aromatic purposes.

  • Buying and Storing It

    • When shopping for lemongrass, look for a smooth, firm stem and nice green leaves without any brown edges. Buy it as fresh as possible and use it fast it can lose its flavor as quickly as a few days after being picked. Wrap it up in paper or damp cloth and store it in the fridge; this can extend its life to a couple of weeks.
    • Dried or powdered lemongrass isn’t nearly as flavorsome as the fresh kind, so don’t buy it unless you have to. This form, although not as potent in flavor, can be useful in teas and curries.
    • As a last resort, you can freeze stems for several months. Having said that, make sure you wrap them separately as they can easily impart flavor to other foods.

    Preparing It

  • • First, discard the tough upper section of the stalk, leaving only the bottom 12-15cm. It can then be used in a variety of ways. For example, it makes for a sturdy, flavorsome skewer for grilling fish or meat.
    • When adding stalks to soups and other dishes, they should be coarsely cut into pieces, bruised by bashing them with the back of a knife or in a pestle and mortar, Thai style. This releases the oils and that wonderful lemony flavor. The pieces are al little tough so they’re usually removed from food before serving.
    • Another option is to strip away all the hard outer layers and very finely slice the inner core, which is tenderer, into thin rings.

    Cooking With It

    • Lemongrass is often found in curries, soups and seafood dishes.
    • Its light lemon flavor compliments garlic, chillies and coriander.
    • Its flavor is very pungent, so be careful to use it in small amounts so it doesn’t overpower other flavors.
    • Lemongrass tea is not only a refreshing drink, but is said to be an appetite stimulant as well as a mild diuretic, which is good news for those suffering from water retention. Chop a lemongrass stalk into 2 cm pieces and bash it with the back of a knife to bring out the flavors. Leave it to brew in a teapot of hot water for 5-8 minutes, depending on how strong you want it.

    Curing With It

    • According to research, lemongrass contains anti-depressant, anti-oxidant, antiseptic, bactericidal and mildly sedative properties.
    • This super herb has also been known to treat certain skin conditions such as acne. A variety of skin oils are made with a mixture of lemongrass with sweet almond or jojoba oil.
    • Lemongrass essential oil is used in aromatherapy for the treatment of nervous exhaustion and other conditions related to stress.
    • Some believe that the essential oil can also serve as an insect repellant.
    • Lemongrass is often used as a lemon scent in products such as soap and candles. Its scent is complemented by that of lavender, jasmine and eucalyptus.

More related articles to Lemongrass:

  • Thanks for reading our artilcle about "Lemongrass" filed under Food Fact articles. one of thousands of originally written Articles published exclusively at khanaPakana.com.

Tried out this recipe? Let us know how you liked it?

Pleasebe judicious and courteous in selecting your words.

Name:
Email:

 
Submit your comments

Comments posted by users for Lemongrass

Featured Brands


Payment Methods
Secure Online Shopping