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Brown Food VS. White Food

Brown Food VS. White Food
A lot has been researched and written about the goodness of brown bread, brown rice, brown sugar and brown eggs. The best way to adopt healthy options in life is to first understand the reasons behind their goodness so one can make a realistic transition to a healthier lifestyle for the long term. By the end of this article you will be able to make a better and wiser choice between the two.
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  • A lot has been researched and written about the goodness of brown bread, brown rice, brown sugar and brown eggs. The best way to adopt healthy options in life is to first understand the reasons behind their goodness so one can make a realistic transition to a healthier lifestyle for the long term. By the end of this article you will be able to make a better and wiser choice between the two.

  • Brown Bread VS. White Bread

  • It isn’t easy for a white bread addict to switch to brown bread because flavor and appearance are the key characteristics that give white bread its appeal. On the other hand, many people are switching after becoming aware of the goodness of whole wheat on their health.

  • In white flour the outer part of the wheat grain which is called ‘bran’ is removed and only the wheat germ is ground to make the flour. It is the bran component that is rich in fiber, vitamins and minerals and these are lost in the process. On the other hand, in whole wheat flour the complete grain is ground to make the flour. It is the exclusion of the bran in the processing of white flour which results in loss of some vital nutrients.

  • Another characteristic that makes brown flour superior to white flour is ‘bleaching’ flour is bleached with certain chemicals after removal of the bran. In some parts of the world food authorities have made it mandatory for manufacturers to fortify white flour with certain vitamins and minerals that are lost in processing. During cooking or baking these flours tend to perform differently and so may require a little variation in the recipes. For example, whole wheat flour needs more moisture in the recipe because the bran absorbs addition moisture.

  • It is also important to carefully read the ‘ingredients’ before buying whole wheat products especially bread because sometimes manufacturers do not use whole grain and add caramel to give brownish look to the bread which can be deceiving and misleading for the buyer.

  • Studies have shown that the consumption of three or more servings of whole wheat bread per day actually help to reduce the risk of type diabetes by up to 30%. Fiber has a bulk forming laxative effect on the intestine which greatly reduces the odds of constipation, hemorrhoids, diverticulosis and even colon cancer.

  • Fiber has the ability to bind cholesterol and excrete it in the stool thus helping to lower LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol and consequently reduce the risk of coronary heart and artery diseases.

  • Brown Rice VS. White Rice

  • The color difference between the two varieties of rice is due to the presence of husk. Brown rice comprises of whole grain, meaning the husk also remains intact, while in white rice the husk is removed and then it is polished to give a smooth and whitish appearance white rice is more popular due to its better taste and effortless cooking making it a staple food of a large population of the world.

  • Brown rice takes longer to cook because of the presence of bran which absorbs more water.

  • Brown rice has a shorter shelf life because the outer portion that remains intact contains fat content that makes it more vulnerable to weather conditions and its quality can spoil easily. With a shelf life of not more than six months it recommended to store it in a refrigerator. The fat containing husk removed in white rice keeps it drier, gives it a longer shelf life and makes it easy to storage at room temperature.

  • Like brown flour, brown rice is superior in nutritional value as compared to white rice. Moreover, researches have shown that the body’s insulin response to brown rice is significantly to opt for brown rice.

  • Consuming 50 grams of brown rice per day can reduce the chances of developing type II diabetes by up to 16% and its fiber content provides the natural goodness associated with dietary fiber. Another research study has indicated that regular use of whole grains can reduce the risk of weight gain and insulin resistance by up to 38%.

  • Brown Sugar VS. White Sugar

  • The white sugar used in our daily life is a simple sucrose that comes from sugar cane. Sugar cane stems are chopped and processed for extraction of cane juice. The juice is then cleaned in several steps to remove impurities and then boiled to evaporate the water content and leave behind sugar crystals.

  • This raw sugar is brownish in color because of the presence of molasses. It is then bleached to remove the molasses to result in pure white sugar. In contrast, molasses are added to white sugar to make it brown sugar. This not only adds color, but also gives it a distinctive taste. The intensity of color and taste depends on the quantity of molasses added. Brown sugar is sweeter in taste than white sugar thus white sugar is more widely accepted and used in households and commercially.

  • Brown sugar while also used for these purposes affects the color of the product and because it contains more moisture it can also affect the texture. It can also become dry on repeated exposure to air. These characteristics make brown sugar products slightly more challenging to mange.

  • Much has been written about the higher nutritional value of brown sugar over white sugar, however the difference is so negligible that it can be easily disregarded on the basis of personal preference. 1 tsp of brown sugar contains 17 calories and 1 tsp of white sugar contains 16 calories. Brown sugar also contains some vital minerals like calcium, potassium, magnesium and iron, but the amount is so minimal that it cannot fulfill the body’s demands for these nutrients and other food options must be chosen for the fulfillment of these minerals.

  • Brown Egg VS. White Egg

  • Stated by the American egg board and by several research studies, egg shell colour does not affect an egg’s nutritional value, quality, flavor, cooking characteristics or shell thickness. It may be a little difficult for some to believe, but the color difference in eggs is simply due to genetic factors in the chicken.

  • It is commonly believed that brown eggs are more nutritious than white eggs, but it has been verified through several researches that there is no real nutritional difference between them. The nutritional difference if any is due to the bird’s feed, activity and environment.



  • Important Note:
    The articles presented are provided by third party authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of KhanaPakana.com. They should not be considered as medical advice or diagnosis. Consult with your physician prior to following any suggestions provided.

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